Doughnut economics – DAWN.COM #EcologicalCrisis #ClimateCrisis #auspol #qldpol #StopEcocide stop stealing our children’s future! #Overshoot #FundOurFutureNotGas #ClimateAction #SDG13

Societies must progress without hurting the environment.

By

THROUGHOUT the course of history, numerous economic theories have emerged as a response to global crises. Within capitalism itself, many economic theories have flourished by countering economic problems and restoring equilibrium. 

For instance, the classical model of economics founded by Adam Smith was perfect for the 19th century. But its smooth running came to an abrupt halt when the Great Depression hit. Continuing with the same model was no longer viable and thus the Keynesian theory came to the rescue. It was the best solution for the depression and helped pull the economies out of it and back on track. 

But in this evolution of theories and models, one thing that has always remained constant is ‘change’. Change is the only constant in our fast-evolving world. Which means that there is no such thing as a perfect model or theory. A theory might be a perfect solution to a particular problem within a certain time frame. 

Societies must progress without hurting the environment.

But as times change so do our problems. And sticking with that old model for the now evolved problem can actually be counterproductive.

The 21st century is mired in its own complex challenges and problems, which the 20th century models are not equipped to deal with. The climate crisis, for instance, poses an existential threat to our planet. But to use the traditional models of unfettered capitalism as a response to it, would be nothing short of an ecocide. 

The conventional economic theory of unbridled capitalist greed has fostered problems like the climate crisis, resource degradation and scarcity, poverty and income inequality which has essentially divided the world into ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’. It, therefore, is critical to use new theories in order to deal with our modern problems.

One such model is doughnut economics, presented by Kate Raworth, a British economist. Doughnut economics aims at fulfilling basic human needs without compromising on the planetary boundaries. It is, in fact, a visual framework of sustainable development where basic human needs are met along with preserving our ecosystem. 

The model is shaped like a doughnut where the inner ring represents the social boundaries which comprise 12 basic human rights like health, education, income, food, water, equality, etc which no one should be deprived of. And the outer ring represents the planetary boundaries or the ecological ceiling comprising nine ecological limits like climate change, air pollution, ozone depletion etc, that must not be crossed while achieving the social goals. Between these two rings is what Kate calls the ‘sweet spot’ which is a safe and just space for humanity to prosper. 

Kate argues that the practice of using GDP as a measure of human and economic well-being is misleading. Thus, striking a balance between our social and environmental goals is what governments must aim for. Our social rights and ecological boundaries must be respected and progress on one must not come at the cost of the other. 

By observing the globe from a doughnut perspective, one finds that poor countries fall below the social boundaries while the rich ones have exceeded the ecological ceiling. This unsustainable growth pattern has landed us into the 21st century crises. Societies, therefore, must strive for a greater quality of life without putting pressure on the environment. 

The practical application of the doughnut model was first undertaken in Amsterdam. According to statistics, one in five people in Amsterdam are unable to meet their basic needs after paying their rent. In the aftermath of the first wave of Covid-19, as the country was preparing to kickstart the economy, a survey was condu­c­ted asking the public their preference for sustainable cities. An overwhelming majority of people opted to sus­tain­ably deve­lop their city according to the doughnut model. This practical application of the model at local level in Amsterdam has inspired other cities like Melbourne and Berlin to follow its lead. 

One particularly interesting aspect of the doughnut model is its flexibility. It allows countries the freedom to design their own ways of achieving the objective of the doughnut model. There is no particular way of achieving social objectives without compromising on our environment. Since every country is at a different level of development they can come up with their own unique and feasible options of how they wish to achieve the said objective.

The conventional economic models are unfit to solve the most pressing crisis of 21st century, ie climate change. We therefore need to bring forth new ideas and models better designed to deal with our modern problems. The doughnut model is one such incredible model of sustainable development incorporating almost all the Sustainable Development Goals in it, along with being practical and flexible, through which any society at any level of development can apply it and thrive. 

The writer is an economist and a sustainable development enthusiast.

Published in Dawn, January 13th, 2022

— Read on www.dawn.com/news/1669140/doughnut-economics

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

Ride the Rising Wave to the 2022 UN Ocean Conference | UN-DESA-VOICE #auspol #qldpol #ClimateCrisis #Ecocide #FundOurFutureNotGas #EcologicalCrisis stop stealing our children’s future! #Overshoot #StopEcocide

Ride the Rising Wave to the 2022 UN Ocean Conference

By Ambassador Peter Thomson, UN SG’s Special Envoy for the Ocean

By now you would all have heard the mantra, there can be no healthy planet without a healthy Ocean, and the Ocean’s health has been measurably in decline for some time now. We need to take to heart that all of us have been party to driving the decline in the Ocean’s health. Thus, we all have a role to play in developing and implementing the solutions.

For the future security of our species on this planet, it is vital, in the true sense of the word, that we stop the decline and work to restore a healthy Ocean. Before describing the big events over the next six months that will all be working on that turn-around, I urge you to consider what your contribution will be? I urge you to discuss this with family and friends, in your communities and workplaces.

As an overarching starting point, your consideration might take up the need for all of our societies to govern our activities with a logical and ethical dedication to sustainability.

I believe the time has come to accept that linear exploitation of finite planetary resources is a dead-end street, and that we have reached a point on humanity’s path whereupon global transformation to circular recycling systems of production and consumption has become a straight-forward matter of survival.

I see this as the great transformational challenge facing us in the 21st Century, a tectonic transformation akin to when human societies moved from the Stone Age to the Bronze Age.

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

Turning to the international events of the next six months. There is a wave that is building, one that that will sweep around the world over the six months, carrying with it the science-based solutions that will make the next UN Ocean Conferencethe seminal moment we need in order to stop the decline of the Ocean’s health. Co-hosted by the governments of Kenya and Portugal, the conference will be held in Lisbon from June 27th to July 1st, 2022. It is mandated by all 193 UN Member States to scale up Ocean Action for the implementation of SDG14, based on those science-based solutions, and on partnerships and the power of innovation. I have no doubt that, like the first UN Ocean Conference in 2017, the Lisbon conference will prove to be a game-changer for Ocean Action around the world, guided by that wise trio of science, innovation and partnerships.

The building wave rises in Brest on the north-west coast of France, where President Macron will host the One Ocean Summit from 9th to 11th February. A week later, the governments of Palau and the US will co-host the Our Ocean Conference in Palau. Every effort is being made to synchronize the content and outcomes of these conferences so that they are carried forward on the wave of solutions as it continues to build.

Then, in Nairobi, at the UN Environment Assembly in the first week of March, attention will turn to the mandating of an internationally binding treaty to combat plastic pollution. Around that time, it’s also expected that the postponed WTO Ministerial Meeting will be held in Geneva, where it is expected that Member States will finally agree to ban the scourge of harmful fisheries subsidies.

In March in New York, the fourth negotiating session of a UN agreement on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ) gets underway. And then, in Kunming, China, at the UN Convention on Biological Biodiversity’s COP15, we hope to see the adoption of a target to conserve 30% of the planet’s surface by 2030.

In June in Geneva, as a direct result of the excellent progress that was made on the Ocean-Climate nexus issues at the UNFCCC COP 26 in Glasgow, the UNFCCC SBSTA will be considering these critical issues a few weeks before we meet at the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon. Meanwhile over the next six months a plethora of business, civil society and scientific conferences are being held at global, regional and national levels, all concerned to see progress in our universal aim of safeguarding the Ocean’s well-being.

The build-up of this wave of multilateral activity on Ocean action is unprecedented, and so it should be. For in describing Ocean-Climate nexus issues as critical, I mean to emphasize that they are inextricably linked to the future of human security. The massive scale at which we burn fossil fuels, creating the greenhouse gases that blanket our atmosphere, are commensurately changing the composition of the Ocean. The Ocean has absorbed 90 per cent of the heat from global temperature rises, so it should not be a surprise that immense changes are underway within it and that we now witness such phenomena as the death of coral reefs. It is tragic to contemplate that if present global warming trends continue, the 21st Century will witness widespread saltwater engulfment of low-lying land, of atolls, and river deltas, that have for thousands of years been home to biodiversity, food production and unique manifestations of human culture.

There are many causes for the decline in the Ocean’s health, including overfishing, habitat destruction and the pollution we inflict, ranging from noise to chemicals to plastic and everything in between. But lest there remain doubt in anyone’s mind, the central fact is that the great nemesis driving the decline in the Ocean’s health is humankind’s continuing burning of fossil fuels. In the name of intergenerational justice, it is time to stop that folly.

— Read on www.un.org/development/desa/un-desa-voice/sdg-blog/2022/01/3210.html

Our day-to-day experiences over the past decade have taught us that there must be limits to our tremendous appetite for energy, natural resources, and consumer goods.

Even utility and oil companies now promote conservation in the face of demands for dwindling energy reserves. And for years some biologists have warned us of the direct correlation between scarcity and population growth.

These scientists see an appalling future riding the tidal wave of a worldwide growth of population and technology.

Overshoot

Hands to the land: environmental education as a response to #EcologicalCrisis #ClimateCrisis #auspol #qldpol #Overshoot #StopEcocide #FundOurFutureNotGas

Why do we disconnect ourselves from nature?

Why do we sustain consumption practices that distance us from reality? 

Why do we build huge buildings and destroy natural areas?

Why don’t we explore those spaces, why don’t we know?

Why don’t we put our hands in the soil, plant trees, compost and produce healthy food free of poisons?

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

In the case of Argentina, several actors in territories with diverse environmental problems share some answers, based on educational processes of change of consciousness that they experience in their communities.

For Aldana Telias, a specialist in environmental education in the areas of management, research and teacher training, the key lies in “historicising” those reflections that invite us to look for the reasons behind this climate and environmental crisis.

“Thinking not only about the reconversion, but also about how we got to this point, and how these conflicts become a matter of teaching and learning”, she analyses.

Talias stresses that “the school dialogues with what happens in the territory, we think about the process of environmental education in school and community environments. They are absolutely related, a teacher is not a subject alien to his or her territory, nor are the children”.

Jorge Serrano has been teaching social sciences for 11 years at School No. 60 in Virrey del Pino, La Matanza, in the Argentine province of Buenos Aires. In all these years, Jorge has seen how the population has grown and the number of land takeovers has increased due to the housing shortage.

Hunger, poverty, pollution and lack of green spaces add to the list of deep-rooted problems. In this region, the existence of the Laferrere Nature Reserve becomes relevant: more than 80 hectares of high biological, social and cultural value that neighbours take care of. It is the last green lung of La Matanza.

Serrano and teachers from different disciplines approach the conflicts from various angles.

They organise festivals, excursions to urban reserves, tree planting days, distribute books and flyers with information about industrial pollution and the silent deaths that are not made visible by the mass media; they also run an agro-ecological vegetable garden.

These are concrete actions to ensure transformation and cultivate a sense of identity for the territory.

School foresters sow awareness in schools in the suburbs of Buenos Aires. Photo: Suyay Britez / PxP

“Next to the school we have a beautiful Pampean grassland, and one of the class activities is to go out and recognise what grasses there are, how important they are for the fauna. On a hot day, it’s much more pleasant to teach a class in a square, under a tree, than in a classroom,” says Serrano.

He explains that “we also have a great variety of seeds, a small pond, a vegetable garden as a source of biodiversity. It’s a space for the whole family.

“It’s good that a community organisation enters the school and challenges the teacher, that these tensions are generated to strengthen the process, these are part of the objectives of environmental education. It is an education of action, a political-pedagogical, interdisciplinary, multi-paradigmatic field of intervention that is oriented towards a fairer society,” explains Telias.

She adds: “Environmental education comes to respond from the educational field to a situation of environmental tragedy, collapse and civilisational, structural and generalised crisis”.

The specialist refers to “environmental literacy” as a concept “much more interesting than raising awareness, because it has to do with knowing about the processes”.

In this respect, she points out: “Often, processes in defence of the territory generate educational processes. In Argentina, they take place in very different ways, because in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area (AMBA) there are not the same environmental problems as in a mining or soybean province.

According to Telias, “this is going to mark a different type of education. It is not something that is so easily taught, it is something that is experienced. You can’t tell others how to live, but rather make them reflect on how they live.

A group of students after a day of harvesting and environmental awareness. Photo: PxP

What’s under the concrete?

Sometimes it’s big parks, a small plot of land next to a train track or the side of a motorway. Sometimes it is the course of a stream. And sometimes it takes the form of a reserve.

The truth is that, in addition to being refuges for native flora and fauna and providing “environmental services” (they help regulate temperatures, absorb rainwater, prevent flooding and purify the air), wild areas and green infrastructure within cities can recreate scenarios conducive to educational experiences, educational work and environmental awareness-raising.

Adriel Magnetti, a student of Biological Sciences at the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA), member of the Network of Urban Protected Areas (RAPU) and legislative advisor on environmental issues in the Chamber of Deputies of the Nation, fights for the conservation of the Ecological Reserve Costanera Norte, in Ciudad Universitaria of the City of Buenos Aires.

It is 20 hectares with a vast biodiversity, including the presence of a wetland that is fed directly by the water of the River Plate.

“It is a militant decision where one is in direct contact with the problems,” he explains.

He explains that “a large part of the city of Buenos Aires is still a wetland, we just landed on top of it”.

But he stresses that “even though we don’t see them, the ecosystems are there, we have them covered by concrete and cement. Both the components such as flora and fauna, fungi, micro-organisms; but also, the processes such as the flow of matter and energy, water, soil, air”.

Magnetti contextualises: “The problem is structural and global, and is related to the conception we have of the environment. It leads us to see as vacant and idle the areas that are not occupied by a project, a house, a building site or a factory.

“It is a mercantilist view of land, where if you can’t put an economic value on it, it’s worthless. And if there is something that biodiversity, cultural, archaeological, historical heritage has, it is an intangible, intrinsic value, which is defined above all by the perception of the community. In this way, we will never be compatible with the cosmovision of our native peoples and rural communities,” he adds.

Children are losing sensitivity to the environment faster and faster, say foresters. Photo: Suyay Britez / PxP

The tree revolution

Graciela Britez is a volunteer at Forestadores Escolares, a project that teaches children and adults to plant trees -from seed and seedling-, to watch them grow, take care of them, fall in love with them and recover their sensitivity to a living being that transcends us. They are environmental promoters dedicated to giving workshops on ecology and reforestation, to enthuse and multiply.

“What happens when we turn off the mind and start recording?

“With a seed, you work on many things: there are values, respect and collateral benefits, thinking beyond myself with a vision for the future. We need a green world, a non-violent, sustainable city, we need to have trees. The teachers we have contacted have made their revolution. We have to take charge of our humanity,” he explains.

Common sense

At Ciudad Universitaria, Magnetti receives contingents of boys and girls who speak English, students from other provinces and countries, special education and prestigious universities.

“When you visit an urban nature reserve, you receive a series of sensory, physical and personal stimuli to build a common sense of what is around you and what is important. Many people can attend them and go through a transformative experience,” he says.

At the same time, Magnetti shares the experience of having been in contact with people in vulnerable situations, with fishermen who went to the reserve to stock up on food, who lived there for a long time and built a relationship with the territory.

“They have installed in our heads that nature goes one way and we go the other, and that any ‘usufructuous’ link such as getting food, providing us with medicine, any type of material or spiritual input that nature contributes to us, is wrong. The relationship will be toxic when natural processes are not respected and it is done with a view to accumulating profitability outside the territories,” he concludes.

The tree as the axis of school environmental practices. Photo: Suyay Britez / IPS

The weight of the law

In June, the Argentine government announced the enactment of Law 27.621, which implements Integrated Environmental Education (IEE) in all of the country’s educational establishments.

The regulatory framework is based on principles stipulated in the National Constitution and in the National Education Law (20.206) and the General Environmental Law (25.675), from which environmental education is considered a fundamental process for the full exercise of citizenship.

“In schools, we have to work hard on what kind of citizenship we want, so that we can question the public and political powers, knowing that the interests we have in front of us are opposed, concentrated and powerful,” says Telias.

He adds that “this whole emerging youth movement on climate change is putting issues on public agendas, such as the Wetlands Act. That generates hope.

For his part, Magnetti says: “The main objective of the Environmental Education Law is to install sustainability as a social project, to dispute the logics of development, to think about the power structures and the balance of power that are put on the table when it comes to making decisions. Building a more prosperous tomorrow is a task that we all have to set ourselves with different degrees of responsibility. There are common and shared but differentiated responsibilities.

The Yolanda Law, which pursues the mission of guaranteeing comprehensive training in the environment, with a sustainable development perspective and with special emphasis on climate change for people working in the public sector, is another important instrument in this challenge of making better decisions.

“This proposes a paradigm shift,” says Magnetti.

“If we have trained civil servants, an active implementation of the Escazú Agreement, and an Environmental Education Law in place, we are on our way to this sustainability project as a social mandate. It is another scenario that is generated for the next generations. However, this is not enough: we have to stop the destruction today”, he concludes.

This article is part of the Planet Community, a journalistic project led by Journalists for the Planet (PxP) in Latin America, of which IPS is a member. This article was also produced with the support of Climate Tracker Latin America.

Read on www.pressenza.com/2022/01/hands-to-the-land-environmental-education-as-a-response-to-the-crisis/

Our day-to-day experiences over the past decade have taught us that there must be limits to our tremendous appetite for energy, natural resources, and consumer goods. Even utility and oil companies now promote conservation in the face of demands for dwindling energy reserves. And for years some biologists have warned us of the direct correlation between scarcity and population growth. These scientists see an appalling future riding the tidal wave of a worldwide growth of population and technology.

A calm but unflinching realist, Catton suggests that we cannot stop this wave – for we have already overshot the Earth’s capacity to support so huge a load. He contradicts those scientists, engineers, and technocrats who continue to write optimistically about energy alternatives. Catton asserts that the technological panaceas proposed by those who would harvest from the seas, harness the winds, and farm the deserts are ignoring the fundamental premise that “the principals of ecology apply to all living things.” These principles tell us that, within a finite system, economic expansion is not irreversible and population growth cannot continue indefinitely. If we disregard these facts, our sagging American Dream will soon shatter completely.

Overshoot

Why we need to acknowledge and categorize heat risks | The West Australian #ClimateCrisis #EcologicalCrisis #Overshoot #StopEcocide stop stealing our children’s future. #FundOurFutureNotGas #auspol #qldpol

Is it time we started to rank heatwaves according to health risks?

By

Dr. Kate Charlesworth 

More Australians die from extreme heat on January 27 than any other day of the year. It’s because after spending the public holiday out in the sun, often drinking alcohol, by the next day many people are suffering from dehydration and heat illness.

Heat is the silent killer that most people don’t take seriously. It has killed more Australians than all other extreme weather events combined. More than bushfires, floods, cyclones. In fact, research shows that there is actually substantial under-reporting of heat-related deaths and that from 2006-2017 more than 36,000 Australians lost their lives due to extreme heat.

Australian doctors are now calling for heat to be recorded on death certificates, to more accurately recognise and understand its impacts. During the record heatwave in Canada last year, an emergency room doctor entered “climate change” as a cause of admission in the medical record of a patient presenting with dehydration on the background of asthma and diabetes. The doctor noted scientific evidence that the heatwave was virtually impossible without human-induced warming, and that the patient would not have been admitted to hospital otherwise.

More than one-third of warm season heat-related deaths are caused by climate change. The World Health Organisation estimates that climate change currently causes 150,000 deaths each year, but if we continue to burn coal, oil and gas, pumping more and more greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere, this number will only escalate.

So what can we do? A number of jurisdictions — including California, Greece and Seville in Spain — are implementing new systems to name and categorise heatwaves, to rank them according to health risks. Such a system could help to raise awareness and to better convey health advice about the risks and could also be the basis for triggering public health responses such as opening cool refuges and free energy for households to run air-conditioners.

However, there is a limit to what the human body can adapt to. In 2018-19, Alice Springs had 55 days above 40C. Combined with drought and widespread poor-quality housing it is likely that parts of central and northern Australia will become unlivable. That means we will have climate refugees in our own country.

As a doctor, I find it inconceivable that Australia — one of the countries on the frontlines of climate-health impacts — is one of the worst on climate action. In fact, we are ranked dead last on climate, which is ludicrous given that strong, urgent action would have substantial health benefits: cleaner air, healthier diets, greener and cooler cities.

A government’s primary responsibility is to protect the health and safety of its people. A Federal Government touting a gas-led recovery, supporting and even funding new fossil fuel projects, and acting as a wrecker in international climate negotiations is one which is actively contributing to a climate-health crisis which is harming its own people.

Diagnosis: heat stroke. Contributing cause: climate change. Underlying cause: government negligence.

Dr Kate Charlesworth is a public health doctor and a Climate Councillor

— Read on thewest.com.au/opinion/why-we-need-to-acknowledge-and-categorize-heat-risks–c-5278103

Climate refugee, migrant – let’s stop counting the differences? #ClimateCrisis #auspol #qldpol #refugees #TellTheTruth #EcologicalCrisis #SDGs

In the days before Christmas about three million people were directly affected by one of the worst storms to hit the Philippines in 50 years. More than half a million lost their homes. Such weather phenomena, like the typhoon that left hundreds of thousands displaced in Mozambique in 2019, are increasing in size, strength and frequency – and experts point to greenhouse gas emissions from human activity as the culprit. Filipino journalist Arnel Murga wrote about how his country contributes less than 0.4% of the world’s excess emissions while the global north is responsible for 92%. The people with the least ability to rebuild are paying the price for problems produced in richer countries.

Cyclone damage Philippines

Sudden disasters are one of the many factors that turn people into refugees, but is it now time to think of the climate emergency as the overarching reason behind the world’s displacement crisis – with 84 million people at the 2021 count? The UN, in its collective political wisdom, recognises only 26.6 million people as refugees, leaving out key groups such as the 5.9 million Venezuelans who have fled economic meltdown – a crisis that has the climate emergency as its backdrop.

It is not just people in the South Pacific – whose islands have sunk beneath their feet – who can be classed as climate refugees, but also 13.5 million Syrians, made homeless by a war that experts say was triggered by the climate crisis, pointing to the severe drought that preceded it.

South Pacific Islands

Despite the ill-informed panic in places such as the south-east of England, the vast majority of people (85% as of 2021) who lose their homes and become refugees don’t arrive in Europe. Instead, they stay in developing countries, those same places bearing the brunt of the economic pressures and food and water shortages that accompany the climate crisis for which the west is mostly responsible.

A migrant, a refugee, an asylum seeker, a climate refugee – is it time we stopped counting the differences? And started acknowledging that displacement is what happens when people find their living conditions intolerable, almost always through no fault of their own. The Guardian and Observer’s charity appeal on behalf of those affected by the climate crisis is still live. The stories we have covered for the appeal are worth reading to understand just how many people that is.

Tracy McVeigh, editor, Global development

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)
“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012.

Planetwide Ecocide

Global Risks Report 2022: What you need to know | World Economic Forum #EcologicalCrisis #ClimateCrisis #Overshoot #auspol #qldpol #TellTheTruth #FundOurFutureNotGas

What are the big risks facing the world in the next 10 years? Check it out in The World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2022.

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

Kate Whiting, Senior Writer, Formative Content

  • Environmental risks dominate the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2022 – for both the short and long term.
  • Climate-change related risks also account for three of the top risks by severity in the next 10 years.
  • The global risks horizon changes over the next two to 10 years, as the cascading impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are felt.
  • Less than 16% of respondents to the Global Risks Perception Survey are ‘optimistic’ or ‘positive’ about the outlook for the world.

Two years on from the first COVID-19 cases, countries are reporting record infections due to the Omicron variant, but the pandemic pales compared to the long-term risks the world faces from climate change. 

This is the sobering view of nearly 1,000 risk experts and global leaders in business, government and civil society in the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2022.

Climate action failure, extreme weather events, and biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse were considered the top three of the top 10 global risks by severity over the next 10 years in the annual Global Risks Perception Survey (GRPS).

Societal risks make up a third of the global top 10, with societal cohesion erosion and livelihood crises completing the top five, while infectious diseases come lower down at number six. 

Climate action failure is also considered the most critical threat to the world in both the medium term (2-5 years) and long term (5-10 years), with the highest potential to severely damage societies, economies and the planet.

Most respondents to the survey believe too little is being done: 77% said international efforts to mitigate climate change have “not started” or are in “early development”.

Our day-to-day experiences over the past decade have taught us that there must be limits to our tremendous appetite for energy, natural resources, and consumer goods. Even utility and oil companies now promote conservation in the face of demands for dwindling energy reserves. And for years some biologists have warned us of the direct correlation between scarcity and population growth. These scientists see an appalling future riding the tidal wave of a worldwide growth of population and technology.

A calm but unflinching realist, Catton suggests that we cannot stop this wave – for we have already overshot the Earth’s capacity to support so huge a load. He contradicts those scientists, engineers, and technocrats who continue to write optimistically about energy alternatives. Catton asserts that the technological panaceas proposed by those who would harvest from the seas, harness the winds, and farm the deserts are ignoring the fundamental premise that “the principals of ecology apply to all living things.” These principles tell us that, within a finite system, economic expansion is not irreversible and population growth cannot continue indefinitely. If we disregard these facts, our sagging American Dream will soon shatter completely.

Risks outlook and global divergence 

In fact, the experts and leaders were not altogether hopeful about the outlook for the world, with less than 16% of respondents to the GRPS ‘optimistic’ or ‘positive’, with the vast majority (84.2%) ‘concerned’ or ‘worried’.

By 2024, the report says, developing economies (except China) will have fallen 5.5% below their pre-pandemic expected GDP growth, while advanced economies will have surpassed it by 0.9%. 

Such global divergence will impact on the world’s ability to tackle common challenges including climate change, enhancing digital safety, restoring livelihoods and societal cohesion, and managing competition in space.

“Widening disparities within and between countries will not only make it more difficult to control COVID-19 and its variants, but will also risk stalling, if not reversing, joint action against shared threats that the world cannot afford to overlook,” says Saadia Zahidi, the Forum’s Managing Director.

The risk horizon changes over the coming years, as the full implications of the pandemic become clearer. 

In the next two years, risk experts and leaders see the erosion of social cohesion, the deterioration of mental health, infectious diseases and livelihood crises as being equal to environmental threats – which are constant across the short to long term. 

In the next five years, economic risks of debt crises and geoeconomic confrontations emerge as governments struggle to balance fiscal priorities. While the long-term top five is dominated by environmental risks.

But amid all the bleak predictions, there’s still reason to hope for more positive outcomes, with the Global Risks Report 2022 including lessons in resilience from the COVID-19 pandemic, advice for cooperation in space, greater cyber resilience and a more sequenced climate transition. 

“The least disruptive climate transition measures will be those that holistically integrate the needs of individuals, societies, businesses and planet.”

— Read on http://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/01/global-risks-report-climate-change-covid19/

Hottest ocean temperatures in history recorded last year | Oceans | The Guardian #ClimateCrisis #EcologicalCrisis #Overshoot #auspol #StopEcocide it’s a crime against humanity! #TellTheTruth

Ocean heating driven by human-caused climate crisis, scientists say, in sixth consecutive year record has been broken.

By

“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

The world’s oceans have been set to simmer, and the heat is being cranked up. Last year saw the hottest ocean temperatures in recorded history, the sixth consecutive year that this record has been broken, according to new research.

The heating up of our oceans is being primarily driven by the human-caused climate crisis, scientists say, and represents a starkly simple indicator of global heating. While the atmosphere’s temperature is also trending sharply upwards, individual years are less likely to be record-breakers compared with the warming of the oceans.

Last year saw a heat record for the top 2,000 meters of all oceans around the world, despite an ongoing La Niña event, a periodic climatic feature that cools waters in the Pacific. The 2021 record tops a stretch of modern record-keeping that goes back to 1955. The second hottest year for oceans was 2020, while the third hottest was 2019.

“The ocean heat content is relentlessly increasing, globally, and this is a primary indicator of human-induced climate change,” said Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado and co-author of the research, published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences.

Warmer ocean waters are helping supercharge storms, hurricanes and extreme rainfall, the paper states, which is escalating the risks of severe flooding. Heated ocean water expands and eats away at the vast Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, which are collectively shedding around 1tn tons of ice a year, with both of these processes fueling sea level rise.

Oceans take up about a third of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activity, causing them to acidify. This degrades coral reefs, home to a quarter of the world’s marine life and the provider of food for more than 500m people, and can prove harmful to individual species of fish.

As the world warms from the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and other activities, the oceans have taken the brunt of the extra heat. More than 90% of the heat generated over the past 50 years has been absorbed by the oceans, temporarily helping spare humanity, and other land-based species, from temperatures that would already be catastrophic.

The amount of heat soaked up by the oceans is enormous. Last year, the upper 2,000 meters of the ocean, where most of the warming occurs, absorbed 14 more zettajoules (a unit of electrical energy equal to one sextillion joules) than it did in 2020. This amount of extra energy is 145 times greater than the world’s entire electricity generation which, by comparison, is about half of a zettajoule.

Long-term ocean warming is strongest in the Atlantic and Southern oceans, the new research states, although the north Pacific has had a “dramatic” increase in heat since 1990 and the Mediterranean Sea posted a clear high temperature record last year.

The heating trend is so pronounced it’s clear to ascertain the fingerprint of human influence in just four years of records, according to John Abraham, another of the study’s co-authors. “Ocean heat content is one of the best indicators of climate change,” added Abraham, an expert in thermal sciences at University of St Thomas.

“Until we reach net zero emissions, that heating will continue, and we’ll continue to break ocean heat content records, as we did this year,” said Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Penn State University and another of the 23 researchers who worked on the paper. Better awareness and understanding of the oceans are a basis for the actions to combat climate change.”

— Read on www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jan/11/oceans-hottest-temperatures-research-climate-crisis

‘Serious ecological crisis’: Experts sound alarm on climate change in Kashmir #Overshoot #EcologicalCrisis #ClimateCrisis #PostDoom #auspol #StopEcocide stop stealing our children’s future!

Dr Shakil Ramshoo said that climate change is the biggest factor for the inclement weather in Jammu and Kashmir.

By


Junaid Kathju

Photography by Vikar Syed for The Kashmir Walla

Srinagar: Following the change in weather pattern that has led to frequent flash floods, landslides and avalanches in Jammu and Kashmir in the past few years, environmental experts are of the opinion that such events could occur repeatedly if immediate steps are not taken to cope with the threatening situation.

Vice-Chancellor, Islamic University of Science and Technology (IUST), Dr Shakil Ramshoo said that climate change is the biggest factor for the inclement weather in Jammu and Kashmir.

“Natural calamities like cloud bursts, landslides are something which can’t be predicted. However, the increase in their intensity is definitely linked to the overall climate change we are witnessing globally,” Ramshoo said.  


“We are simply talking about the very life support system of this planet.”
Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, Germany’s former chief climate scientist (2009)

“Burning all fossil fuels would create a very different planet than the one that humanity knows. The palaeoclimate record and ongoing climate change make it clear that the climate system would be pushed beyond tipping points, setting in motion irreversible changes, including ice sheet disintegration with a continually adjusting shoreline, extermination of a substantial fraction of species on the planet, and increasingly devastating regional climate extremes” and “this equates 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year” . James Hansen et al. 2012 and James Hansen 2012. 

Planetwide Ecocide

Ramshoo, who has done extensive research on hydrology, glaciology and climate change impact studies in the Himalayan region, said that the penetration in the fragile ambiances in the name of development is the biggest factor for the environmental degradation in the valley.

“Factors like urbanization, developmental infrastructure are the main reasons that our environment is getting polluted which later results in landslides and other disasters,” he said. “The latest example of ill planned developmental work is four-lanning of Srinagar-Jammu highway. And the results are in front of us. Every day we are witnessing landslides along the highway.”

Following the fresh snowfall on Friday evening in the valley, the traffic movement on the Srinagar and Jammu highway was again closed for vehicular traffic after fresh landslides in Ramban sector.

Many areas across J&K including Trikuta hills of Mata Vaishnodevi and tourist resorts of Bhaderwah and Patnitop in Jammu region experienced season’s first snowfall.

Ramshoo said that the government should come up with eco-friendly developmental policies to safeguard nature.

“In 2014, some of the areas in south Kashmir witnessed 620 millimeters of rain that resulted in floods. Such extreme rainfall is alarming,” he said.

Kashmir has a long history of floods, with most of them linked to the Jhelum river. According to the data, the worst floods that the valley has witnessed were in the year 1841, 1893, 1903, 1929, 1948,1950, 1957, 1992, and in 2014.

Experts believe that deforestation, unplanned construction, river pollution, and overuse of chemical fertilizers by farmers are some of the factors that have led to the drastic change in the environment, making it more vulnerable to natural disasters over time.

Environmental lawyer and activist Nadeem Qadri said that the tempering secrets of nature are the direct results of environmental degradation that Kashmir is facing today.

 “I have been crying for the past 10 years that we are living in a fragile environment which needs to be protected, but nobody is listening to me. We as a society, as a government have failed to save nature,” Qadri said.

Our day-to-day experiences over the past decade have taught us that there must be limits to our tremendous appetite for energy, natural resources, and consumer goods. Even utility and oil companies now promote conservation in the face of demands for dwindling energy reserves. And for years some biologists have warned us of the direct correlation between scarcity and population growth. These scientists see an appalling future riding the tidal wave of a worldwide growth of population and technology.

Overshoot

“This summer we witnessed 38 degree Celsius in Kargil. It is unprecedented. And yet we are in deep slumber,” he said.

Qadri said that the allocation of the budget for afforestation in Kashmir is not even 2 percent.

In June last year, at least eight persons died and 20 persons are feared missing while several structures got damaged after cloudbursts triggered flash floods in different parts of Jammu and Kashmir amid incessant rains. 

“Kashmir Himalayas are facing serious ecological crises. We need to address the issue at the earliest, otherwise what we are witnessing today is only the beginning of what is to come. It is an SoS situation,” he said.

— Read on thekashmirwalla.com/serious-ecological-crisis-experts-sound-alarm-on-climate-change-in-kashmir/

Stealing our future. #DontLookUp #EcologicalCrisis #ClimateCrisis Humanity in crisis. #OverShoot #PostDoom #Ecocide #TellTheTruth #auspol #qldpol

For many years I have been writing this blog. I began after doing some online open university courses on climate change. One of these courses encouraged students to open a WordPress blog that’s how it began in 2007. I had been aware of the problems of continuous growth after reading Limits to Growth in the 1970s.

Infinite growth on a finite planet is a fantasy

I was a founding member of the Australian Democrats after listening to a speech given at the Perth town hall by Don Chipp in 1977. I knew that politics had to change then and I have been fighting for that change most of my life. I have used my blog to research, relieve my frustrations and try to create an awareness for the need for change.

For me it has been a long journey, forty five years of Neoliberalism has led humanity to the brink of extinction. I have recently discovered Michael Dowd and his amazing work on his blog Post Doom. His work on YouTube is outstanding.

Michael Dowd has put so much effort and time into the ecological crisis humanity is currently facing. His wisdom and understanding is a great way to learn about our situation. Michael has been on a similar journey he introduces his followers to scientists, ecologists and thinkers. It’s comforting to know we are not alone.